USPTO Expands Random Audit Program

On July 29, 2019, the USPTO hosted a panel discussion outlining the details of its newly-expanded random audit program, as part of its ongoing efforts to declutter the U.S. federal trademark Register.

Originally launched as a pilot program in 2012, the Random Audit Program was made permanent in November 2017, requiring additional proof of use for goods and services covered by over 4,600 registrations. The USPTO has now announced that it plans to expand the program to audit approximately 5,000 registrations each year and has reemphasized that the U.S. trademark registration system protects only those trademarks and service marks actually in use in U.S. commerce – and can not be used as a reservation of rights system.

What Kinds of Registrations are Subject to Audit? Continue reading

USPTO’s Recently Announced Pilot Program on Fraudulent Specimens

This is Part III in a series on establishing use in commerce in the US for federal trademark purposes. Part I was “Common Questions: How to Establish US Trademark Rights.”  Part II was “Common Questions: How to Prove Use in Commerce (Specimens)“. This Part III will discuss a recently announced pilot program of the USPTO to minimize the submission of fraudulent trademark specimens in support of applications for registration.

On March 6, 2018, the USPTO announced that it was launching a pilot program to uncover fraudulent specimens filed in support of use-based applications. The USPTO described these specimens as “digitally altered” or manipulated. For instance, the USPTO recently refused registration to the following use-based applications for which the specimens were held to be fake: Continue reading

Common Questions: How to Prove Use in Commerce (Specimens)

This is Part II in a series on establishing use in commerce in the US for federal trademark purposes. Part I was “Common Questions: How to Establish US Trademark Rights.” Part III will discuss a recently announced pilot program of the USPTO to minimize the submission of fraudulent trademark specimens in support of applications for registration.

Clients frequently ask for guidance about what specimens (i.e., examples of current use of their trademarks or service marks) to submit in support of their applications for registration with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO). The answer, to some degree, is “it depends.”

What Specimens are Acceptable for Which Goods/Services?

For additional information on this topic, see also Common Questions: What’s the Difference Between a Trademark and a Service Mark?

The basic guidance from the USPTO’s Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure (TMEP) is as follows: Continue reading

Common Questions: How to Establish US Trademark Rights

This is Part I in a series on establishing use in commerce in the US for federal trademark purposes. Part II will discuss how to prove use in commerce and what kinds of specimens qualify. Part III will discuss a recently announced pilot program of the USPTO to minimize the submission of fraudulent trademark specimens in support of applications for registration.

Clients frequently ask for guidance about how to establish use in commerce to support their applications to the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (USPTO) for registration of their trademarks and service marks. This post will address establishing use in commerce, generally, including why it is necessary to evidence such use and how much use would be sufficient. Continue reading

Common Questions – What’s Involved in Registering a US Trademark?

So, you’ve decided to launch a brand name in the U.S. and are contemplating registering it in the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office (“PTO“). What can you expect? Not every application is the same, so there will be variations in exactly what happens in the prosecution of your application, but hopefully this will serve as a “Trademark 101 Primer” to describe the basic process overall.  (Note – this post is for general information purposes only and does not provide any specific legal advice.  Contact your trademark attorney to discuss any areas of specific concern.)

BASICS

What is a Trademark? It’s a word, phrase, symbol or design, or a combination of words, phrases or designs, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others. A service mark performs the same function as a trademark, but applies to the source of a service rather than of a product. (For simplicity, this post refers to trademarks and service marks collectively as “trademarks.”)

How Valuable is a Good Trademark? The value of a good trademark lies in its ability to convey to the public the source of a particular good or service. The key is to develop a mark unique enough that customers associate it with your goods or services – and only your goods and services. While temptingly simple, choosing a mark that describes your goods and services will not create any trademark value. Customers won’t know to distinguish your goods from others in the same market.

Can  Rights Develop Based on Use? Federal registration is not a requirement to protect trademarks in the U.S. – instead, rights in a particular trademark can be established simply based on use in connection with particular goods or services in the marketplace (aka “common law trademark rights”). Nevertheless, federal registration offers more comprehensive protection than reliance upon common law rights, including providing nationwide notice of the owner’s claim to the mark.

TRADEMARK APPLICATION PROCESS
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