New Law Prohibits Non-Disparagement Provisions in Form Consumer Contracts

On December 14, 2016, President Obama signed into law H.R. 5111, a bill that prohibits companies from including within their standard form contracts with its consumers a non-disparagement clause that would prevent such customers from making any statements about the company’s products, services or employees. The Consumer Review Fairness Act of 2016 (“CRFA” or “the Act”) passed overwhelmingly in both the House and the Senate, garnering bipartisan support. See also House Debate, 162 Cong. Rec. H5295-H5298 (daily ed. Sept. 12, 2016) (statements upon introduction by bipartisan cosponsors). In fact, H.R. 5111 passed in the Senate, without amendment, on Unanimous Consent on November 28, 2016. See Senate Debate, 162 Cong. Rec. S6520 (daily ed. Nov. 28, 2016). Upon signing by the president, the Bill became Public Law No. 114-258.

Provisions and Application of CRFA

The law prohibits any “person” (which could be an individual or an entity) from “offer[ing] a form contract containing a provision described as void in subsection (b).” Id. §2 (c). Such provisions that are “void from the inception of the contract” include at least one of the following prohibited characteristics: Continue reading

Business Owners & the New Federal Claim for Trade Secret Misappropriation

On May 11, 2016, Pres. Obama signed into law the Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016, S. 1890, 114th Congr. (2d Sess. 2016) (“DTSA“), which provides for the first time a federal private right of action to litigants for trade secrets violations. Most states – except for Massachusetts and New York – have enacted versions of the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (“UTSA“) but the DTSA provides additional remedies without preempting state laws or eliminating any of the protections offered by them. Business owners will need to take some actions in the short term in order to take advantage of some of the more powerful remedies created by the DTSA.
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New “Personal Information Privacy” Legislation Introduced

On January 8, 2014, Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt) re-introduced a personal privacy protection bill intended “to prevent and mitigate identity theft, to ensure privacy, to provide notice of security breaches, and to enhance criminal penalties, law enforcement assistance, and other protections against security breaches, fraudulent access, and misuse of personally identifiable information.”  Personal Data Privacy and Security Act of 2014, S. 1897 at preamble (introduced Jan. 8, 2014).  Sen. Leahy introduced prior versions of this bill in 2005, and in each of the four Congresses since.  Press Release, “Leahy Reintroduces Data Privacy Legislation,” Jan. 8, 2014.

Sen. Leahy’s published summary of the bill provides a detailed list of the key components.  There are two principal titles in this bill:  1) Enhancing Punishment for Identity Theft and Other Violations of Data Privacy and Security; and 2) Privacy and Security of Personally Identifiable Information (“PII”).  (There is a third title, relating to compliance with a statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act, but the text is a short paragraph and just relates to budget compliance.)  See Leahy’s Section-By-Section Analysis of the Bill.

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Open Forum at ABA Annual Meeting on Online Piracy and Counterfeiting

In August 2012, the Intellectual Property Law (IPL) Section of the American Bar Association (ABA) will be hosting an open forum during the ABA Annual Meeting in Chicago on online piracy and counterfeiting. I will be moderating one panel (on the scope and severity of the problem) and one of my co-chairs of the Joint Task Force on Online Piracy and Counterfeiting, Chris Katopis, will be moderating the other (essentially, on the U.S. government’s response and remedies). During these panels, and through the work of the Task Force, we are focusing on conduct by entities offshore – essentially foreign sites that currently are beyond U.S. jurisdiction, but who may be engaged in significant copyright piracy of U.S. works and/or trademark counterfeiting of U.S. trademarks.
 

More details about the panels can be found on the ABA’s Annual Meeting Site, and in particular, the Intellectual Property Law Section’s description of the IPL programs that will occur during the meeting.

This panel follows a similar panel that I moderated in March, during the IPL Section’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. (page 9). We had excellent attendance and feedback after the program. I am hoping for a similar result from the Chicago panel discussion, and look forward to getting feedback and input from the attendees about these issues.

In the meantime, here are some governmental resources that identify some of the concerns, and the impacts on the U.S. economy of piracy & counterfeiting that originates outside our borders, but is directed to a U.S. audience:

I look forward to seeing you in August.

Senate Committee on the Judiciary Schedules Hearing on FOIA


The Senate Committee on the Judiciary announced today that it will be holding a hearing on March 13, 2012 at 10:30 am in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on “The Freedom of Information Act: Safeguarding Critical Infrastructure Information and the Public’s Right to Know.” A list of expected witnesses has not yet been published.

It appears that this hearing will be simulcast over the Internet, so please check back on the Senate’s hearing announcement as the date gets closer for more details and a link to the simulcast.